Two sides

The two sides of…Creative Spaces

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Creative spaces are often cited as examples of how the most innovative companies take their creative processes seriously.  We have all heard of the efforts of Pixar to ensure maximum creativity from their staff through the design of their building to maximize unscripted interactions, from centralized bathrooms to freedom to decorate your workspace Pixar lives creativity and its employees wear it on their sleeves.  Should your company investigate creative spaces as a means of improving innovation?  The answer is not so simple.

Heads

The problem of how to organize a physical space to drive innovation is a well-known one, having spawned numerous books (see The Organization and Architecture of Innovation by Allen and Henn) and consultancies. Having spent decades maximizing the value captured from efficiency in the ‘organizational diagram’ leaders were bound to recognize that the layout of the actual physical space is equally important to drive productivity and, ultimately, innovation. The problem with implementing the biggest and boldest suggestions to boost innovation and productivity is that it necessitates huge expenditures of capital in order to refurbish old spaces to new layouts. Obviously, this isn’t always compatible with budget or other goals – thus the appearance of ‘Creativity Spaces’!

In order to meet the demand for a place within the office environment where workers can think freely and openly – trying to capture that eureka-in-the-shower moment – old meetings rooms get refurbished with TVs, games, bold colors, and comfy chairs. These places can be easily dismissed as places to waste time. However, for the relatively limited capital requirements they have to be considered as a positive first step. Just having one place in the office that doesn’t feel like the office can encourage teams and meeting groups to think more freely and creatively. Many articles on this blog advocate drastic steps to get free thinking and creativity into your team; the message that should be taken forward is that anything you can do to shake things up and break people out of their typical role is great for boosting innovative output. Doesn’t that align perfectly with having your lead chemist showing everyone their newest moves on Dance Dance Revolution? For the Osmotic Innovator making do with less is an art form – perhaps Creativity Spaces aren’t a Picasso but they’re at least an easel and a brush.

Tails

Creative spaces are really the result of creative cultures.  When people work in a creative culture they build their own creative spaces and in some instances these spaces may not even look (to the casual observer) very creative at all.  We are talking about the water cooler, the original “creative space”.  “If you build a creative culture the culture will build their creative space” is probably a better approach for most businesses to take.  Without the right culture the creative space discussion shouldn’t even be started.

Can you really define what a creative space should be for your business?  What works for Pixar might be useless for your company.  Can a laboratory or engineering shop be a “creative space”?  Sure it can, and in many companies these areas are far more likely to be creative than any artificially designed space of bright colours and soft furnishings.  Don’t fall for the idea that if it looks fun then it must be creative; many companies have demonstrated phenomenal creative endeavour simply by giving their employees access to the same old facilities but without corporate agenda.

Creative spaces must be built; your work environment is unlikely to have been designed with creativity in mind.  Creativity feeds off networking so is there a way of causing more cross functional interactions within your employees without going to the extremes of building redesign?  Maybe careful placement of coffee bars or mixed function open plan offices would work better than prescribed “creative spaces”.

Overall the design of creative spaces within corporations should be seen as a means of reinforcing a strong corporate innovation culture, not as a means of creating one.  There are many more cost effective ways of doing that.

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